Latest from Līgo Haībun!

Fly Indie bookshop, in conjunction with 

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Williamson Books

a small publishing company, is collecting haibun for an upcoming haibun anthology.to be published in early summer.  Please visit here, where more details will be published shortly, as well as this blog site.

We are currently open for submissions. Please click on details on ‘About Haibun‘ in the link if you are not sure about requirements.

DRAWINGS/PHOTOGRAPHS  We are in need of artwork and photographs too. Be aware that in many ebook versions and possibly on the paperback version this will be rendered in black and white!

If your work is accepted, payment will be equal distribution of profits if this sum exceeds GBP500.00, and an automatic free copy of ebook. All paperbacks purchased by haibun contributors will be sold to them at cost, which is at about a 70% reduction on the listing price. Haibun authors are then free to resell these with no restrictions. Should minimum profits cover paperback costs then 1 free paperback will be allocated to each contributor.

Un-published material only please. Haibun previously published on a blog will be happily considered pending the publishing date, and upon agreement that the haibun be deleted from the blog upon acceptance All rights revert back to the artist after publication. All writing should be in Times New Roman, 12 point font, 1.5 line spaced, by pdf file.  Please include a five-line bio.

All submissions should be sent to williamson@flyindie.today

or by skype to fly.indie

Thanks!

Notes on the LĪGO HAĪBUN CHALLENGE, the Web’s Original Haibun Challenge

Come join us in our weekly LĪGO HAĪBUN CHALLENGE! Here’s some notes about haibun to help you get started.

 

  • Haibun is a passage of prose with at least one haiku.
  • Haibun usually relate to a journey, whether the travels are exploration or  internal, and/or should be in contact with nature.
  • They can and ought to contain an epiphany received through experience.
  • The concept of a haibun being part of the series, or an ‘episode’ is a very important one, and often overlooked. Your haibun should tie together by some strand, either theme, location, journey or other.
  • The haiku describes a moment or happening. As part of the haibun it might serve as a ‘mirror’ or look at the prose in a ‘different’ way.
  • Use of a ‘season’ word is a classical way of writing a haiku. These are words that signify a given season and give the haiku earthing or anchoring.
  • Each week, at the Līgo Haībun Challenge here is a choice of two prompt words, quotes, or visuals. Please choose one for your haibun.
  • Wear the Ligo badge below with pride on your blog! And pin the Circle of Appreciation to your blog  if your haibun is one of the monthly  Honourable Mentions in Dispatches

Click on the url below to join the challenge!

Haibun as a literary form really started when Basho, the ‘father’ of haiku set off on a 2,400 km walk through Japan, deliberately straying into the mountains when he could. The travel journals were a mix of prose studded with haiku, and were published titled ‘Narrow Road To The Deep North’. Frankly, it is a wonderful book, and started a very special form of writing. Basho claimed the art and heart of haibun as his with his reflective writing, awareness and sharp imagery.

While seen as a classical form in Japan, haibun has seen a revival in English over the past decades.

People should write their haibun in the way they like to write. However, I do think that the register of the language used, not the style, is important. There is a difference.

The above looks difficult, but in fact we are not talking about a story with a twist here – at all, though a moment of discovery or epiphany in a haibun fits very well.

The first thing I look to in a haibun is if the writer was at the scene or not him or herself.  The scene may be a memory, or a plan, merely witnessed or interacted with, or a mix of many or all of those.

It is not a story, though is a narrative. Personally I find it hard to read a haibun not interacting with nature. Indeed, an emphasis on emotion and not imagery is something that does not work in a haibun as a whole.

I am personally not a fan of direct speech, or lengthy direct speech in a haibun.

Remember that with the prose comes one or more haiku, and they must relate – when they do it is wonderful reading, but those who write a beautiful prose and don’t carefully tie it together with a powerful haiku miss something, I think.

I do very much see haibun coming in a series, rather like a diary, so would accordingly expect each haibun written by a given writer not be completely and totally separate from the one before. But if you are writing about your thoughts, actions, journey or a period in your life this seems logical to me.

A deeper meaning to the haiku might be found by the reader, but that is the reader’s prerogative, not the writer’s.

  • Līgo is the largest summer solstice festival in the world very much connected to nature, and located in Latvia. Of recent years a similar New Year festival at around the same time has been gaining popularity in Yakutia and will probably catch on in Kazakhstan.

 

 

Carpe Diem Haiki, Mandara-ji

I could show you a magic trick. I could give you a book for you to take home, for those long rainy nights alone. I could bake a chocolate cake for you, or show you my favourite film, or fashion a copper bangle for you, that shines in golden evenings.

Under a streetlamp, as the last snowflakes of winter drift downwards, I could kiss you. And then I would write a haiku for you.

of this emptiness
that cannot be filled with words
-even snowflakes melt

rain-dancer

Ligo Haibun Challenge – Image Week

Thanks to everyone participating in the Ligo Haibun Challenge – if you would like you can post your haibun at Medium here, and label it under the “Beautiful Haibun” collection. This gives you further readership and gives you a step out of the ‘WordPress world.’

My apologies for the lateness of the post this week. I was a bit exhausted after travel and duties, and have a lot of catching up to do. There are a lot of fine people out there and I don’t want to lose them…so I will be catchng up, especially as I want the Ligo anthology out soon – so send your haibun!

I will be contacting folks very shortly about their haibun – that probably means you reading this!

This week is picture week. As usual choose one to write your Beautiful Haibun. I certainly encourage all glancing here to have a read of the haibun, which are of very high quality in an art form that in itself encourages beautiful writing.

If you are new to the form ask here for details..

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Please give us some beautiful haibun! Link up with the blue critter below..

http://goo.gl/KAbZf4

Shaman Haiku

Shaman haiku are a genre that I think have just been started at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai

Here’s what I think they feature:

  • the presence of a shaman, or shamanistic object or ritual
  • or the presence of a wild (ie free, culturally apt) animal specifically linked to shamanistic practice
  • a haiku where there is something akin to a shaman’s journey. Ie, it cannot be static, may have dream-like qualities but they should also then include the above.
  • the reader is no longer the appreciative audience, but is directly involved in the haiku, the journey or happening.The reader moves along with the haiku. In fact, the reader is the haiku.
  • following are four excellent and topical examples of shaman haiku, or shaman-influenced haiku. As far as I am concerned, they are the first four of the genre, started by Kristjaan Panneman, who runs Carpe Diem Haiku Kai, and who writes haiku under the pen name of Chèvrefeuille. The first haiku is his. See how you soar with the eagle. Why is the cry silent. Is it within you? Why did the eagle ‘step’ into the world of dreams? Was it the last step into the void, to soar? Was it a shaman’s step? Was it your step into the haiku?

flight of the eagle
stepping into the world of dreams -
a silent cry

The next haiku is by Ryan. Notice, and feel, the sudden jolted stop. Specifically matched to the increasing tempo. Then notice the sudden silence around you. It may be that I would be even more sparse with the words, dropping the ‘also’, but I did not think of, nor write, nor could write the haiku, so that is presumptuous and pretentious of me. Written by Bryan Ens.

the drum beats faster
while heart-rates increase also
sudden stop. peace

The third haiku was written by Asni. It is a pearl. Just look at that. The release. The eagle suddenly soaring. From where? From the reader momentarily? At what stage? Now read it again. Can you see other possibilities? Wonderful.                                     

faster and faster
the beating of my heart …
an eagle’s cry

Now look at how Bjorn Rudberg composes a haibun, with a one line/17 syllable *American sentence* haiku at the conclusion. Notice how the readers ‘feels’ and ‘senses’ the haiku. Actually, that one line haiku is so full I think I should refrain from comment and just let you experience the sensations. But look at what Bjorn did, also, to build you to that moment; to set the scene.

At some point in our long trip I realize that, though the taiga looks much the same we have came so far into the east, that the train is the thin rope that still connects us to the familiarity of the west we know. We are divide from the forests and the big rivers only by the thin shell of the railway car. We live in bubble of western life but I still sense an unfamiliar taste in the tea from the samovar in the corridor. Like the breath from a dragon I feel the iciness of the air as I open the window to let the Siberian air replace the stale smell of cigarette smoke.

The air filled with drumbeats from a shaman’s skin smells like fresh pine needles

I think the connection to the wilderness of nature and spiritual nature of shamanism is clear in all four haiku, that seem to flow so well together in this new theme or genre. I will attempt mine now. I am quite confident I cannot match any of the four of the above.

under an eagle
I dance to the heart beat
of a shaman’s drum

The haiku is fine, but I am happy it shows, and really highlights, just how wonderful the four above are. http://chevrefeuillescarpediem.blogspot.fi/

image

Shaman Woman by Ksenia Spanielf Savchenko

Carpe Diem Haiku – hunger moon

This feature is very similar with the other Special feature “Make The Haiku Complete”. So if you would read more than visit  “Carpe Diem Haiku Kai”

Here is the First Line to use in the haiku. 
hunger moon

“Hunger Moon” is the name of the full moon of January as it is mentioned in Thomas’s ‘Old Farmers Almanac’ (founded in 1792). During this month the wolves once roamed the countryside, thus suggesting the name wolf moon. In cold and temperate climates of the Northern Hemisphere, it was difficult to find food during January, thus the name hunger moon.

hunger moon
I put my pen down
and pick up my sword

Ligo Haibun Challenge – Quote Prompt Week

Winter on one side, summer on the other, we drift into December. There were some beautiful haibun last week, making the choice of Honourable Mentions absurdly difficult again. Thank you again, wonderful contributors.

This week is quote week again. Please choose one as always continued…

Weekly Ligo Haibun Challenge – Word Prompt

The Ligo Haibun challenge is here. This week is the word prompt challenge.

Now, regarding the Honourable Mentions. Again difficult this week, maybe even more so, as contributors have been cultivating the style. This means that you know haibun, and have decided how you will write your own. We looked at these haibun closely first.
the need to be out in nature is exemplified in this haibun here, and one emphasises with it very much.
The interaction with nature was exemplified in http://nicolethelocalartist.wordpress.com/2013/11/25/ligo-haibun-challenge-a-handful-of-earth/. Just look at how nature has influenced the people in the haibun personally – in the prose and seamless verse.
In a similar way, but using well selected objects, http://bastetandsekhmet.wordpress.com/2013/11/22/ligo-haibun-challenge-picture-prompt/ creates tension so well, and again her verse and prose work together so well.
http://julesinflashyfiction.wordpress.com/2013/11/22/a-ligo-haibun-regrets/ also pulls emotion to the reader, in again a haibun where the prose and verse interact so well.
http://seraphim6.me/2013/11/26/cold-stone-mountain/ did something very interesting. Her haibun was based around a message to the reader, something I’m normally a bit wary of in habun, but she has put her style onto the haibun, and created her genre, and I enjoy her writing so much. I think many would agree with what she is saying, and the writing flows very nicely.
  • The Honourable Mentions. We like to select no more than 3, but will go as far as 1/3 of participants in a given week, which is what I have done, so we have 4 this week.
http://twoscamps.wordpress.com/2013/11/22/ligo-haibun-challenge-7/ a very poignant piece, with an underlying theme that really resonated. I also liked the idea, simple but effective, of looking at a moment in the past, but this haibun goes further than that.
http://creativemetaphor.wordpress.com/2013/11/23/exhale/ this haibun is a journey itself. I am always quite surprised, to say the least, when writers can write a beautiful piece then go on and better it the week after. This haibun is quite beautiful, and I almost do not want to say anything more about it – would much rather you went to the site and read it, then you’ll agree.
http://peripateticeric.wordpress.com/2013/11/23/ligo-haibun-challenge-misty-mountains/ a pause in an exotic location high in the mountains. There is only one writer who masters these moments so well. He is mentioned for this one and the others he wasn’t mentioned for, all of a high standard.
http://friendlyfairytales.com/2013/11/26/letters-from-japan-haibun/ this haibun is as orginal as they come, and looks deceptively easy to do, as everything that is done so well. A very impressive haibun, for its originality.
Continue reading for this week’s  word prompt…

This Week At The Ligo Haibun Challenge

Haiku is the  customary close to a haibun’s prose, and fits so well, but in our innovation week we are not obliged to limit ourselves to haiku. What we must not forget is that the haiku, either one or more, is a distillation of the prose, in a contrasting form, and seems to enhance the prose, while of course the prose itself raises the haiku up.

In saying that, there are other forms that might also work with prose to create a particular magic.

So this week, in innovation week make a choice between haiku or tanka, or pathya vat from Cambodia, orthanbauk from Burma, now Myanmar, to go with your prose. You may also choose another form, though I would hesitate to go much further in volume than a tanka, which does make me slightly uneasy, as the balance just may be ‘wrong.’ 

Pathya vat is a four-line poem, with 4 syllables each line – and line 2 and 3 must rhyme. Here’s one I tried.

my forest walk
is long enough
to stop my rust
-meditation

XXXX
XXXA
XXXA
XXXX

Yes, I know, not very deep – but there isn’t prose behind it, and to be honest a couple of paragraphs describing my feelings among the trees might go nicely with this.

Thanbauk is poetry of three lines with four syllables on each line. The rhyme pattern of thanbauk can be seen below, with 4th, 3rd and 2nd syllables rhyming in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd lines. Here’s my first attempt, without any prose to give it more depth as a haibun.

X X X A
X X A X
X A X X

a coffee poured
eyes adored, hers 
her, bored, so tired

As you have noticed I haven’t mentioned syllable requirements for the tanka. Let’s generally label the requirements frameworks. In tanka they are  (notionally for Ligo Haibun) 5-7-5-7-7 syllables. 

Should you prefer to use the haiku as is customary, there are 3 forms that are variants. One is the 5-7-5 syllable English language format, which stresses form over meaning. another one that is popular is the haiku over 3 lines with no more than 17 syllables in total, but no line requirement, and the third is freestyle with no syllable count over 3 lines.

This week is quote prompt week. You do not need to include the quote in the haibun, and normally it is not included but used as inspiration for your haibun. As always, choose one.

It is not enough to know how to ride – you must also know how to fall.–Mexican Proverb
It is solved by walking. –Algerian Proverb

WEEKLY LIGO HAIBUN CHALLENGE HERE

Carpe Diem Haiku Kai – Colossus of Rhodos

to stop honour killings
and stop feminists ignoring this
men must be Colossus of Rhodes’

forest

Written and posed for in the name of those beautiful women murdered. In European countries honour killings are not given the attention they deserve.  Femdem are right to remove their tops when they protest. Our societies need to show just how ridiculous the concept of ‘family honour’ is. We need mainstream Feminism to stop ignoring this issue and pretending it belongs to some ethnic minority in their countries and does not concern them. It is racism to not speak out in defence of women murdered, and the total absence of Feminist voices in this regard is a scandal. We must stand tall and be counted about this.

Join Carpe Diem Daily Haiku Here

Autumn Hues to Autumn Haiku

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sun kisses forest
trees glow in wild abandon
autumn in splendour

                                                                     Celestine Nudanu

Celestine is a blogger in Ghana. Please click on her name to see more of her wonderful haiku and writings.