Shaman Haiku

Shaman haiku are a genre that I think have just been started at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai

Here’s what I think they feature:

  • the presence of a shaman, or shamanistic object or ritual
  • or the presence of a wild (ie free, culturally apt) animal specifically linked to shamanistic practice
  • a haiku where there is something akin to a shaman’s journey. Ie, it cannot be static, may have dream-like qualities but they should also then include the above.
  • the reader is no longer the appreciative audience, but is directly involved in the haiku, the journey or happening.The reader moves along with the haiku. In fact, the reader is the haiku.
  • following are four excellent and topical examples of shaman haiku, or shaman-influenced haiku. As far as I am concerned, they are the first four of the genre, started by Kristjaan Panneman, who runs Carpe Diem Haiku Kai, and who writes haiku under the pen name of Chèvrefeuille. The first haiku is his. See how you soar with the eagle. Why is the cry silent. Is it within you? Why did the eagle ‘step’ into the world of dreams? Was it the last step into the void, to soar? Was it a shaman’s step? Was it your step into the haiku?

flight of the eagle
stepping into the world of dreams -
a silent cry

The next haiku is by Ryan. Notice, and feel, the sudden jolted stop. Specifically matched to the increasing tempo. Then notice the sudden silence around you. It may be that I would be even more sparse with the words, dropping the ‘also’, but I did not think of, nor write, nor could write the haiku, so that is presumptuous and pretentious of me. Written by Bryan Ens.

the drum beats faster
while heart-rates increase also
sudden stop. peace

The third haiku was written by Asni. It is a pearl. Just look at that. The release. The eagle suddenly soaring. From where? From the reader momentarily? At what stage? Now read it again. Can you see other possibilities? Wonderful.                                     

faster and faster
the beating of my heart …
an eagle’s cry

Now look at how Bjorn Rudberg composes a haibun, with a one line/17 syllable *American sentence* haiku at the conclusion. Notice how the readers ‘feels’ and ‘senses’ the haiku. Actually, that one line haiku is so full I think I should refrain from comment and just let you experience the sensations. But look at what Bjorn did, also, to build you to that moment; to set the scene.

At some point in our long trip I realize that, though the taiga looks much the same we have came so far into the east, that the train is the thin rope that still connects us to the familiarity of the west we know. We are divide from the forests and the big rivers only by the thin shell of the railway car. We live in bubble of western life but I still sense an unfamiliar taste in the tea from the samovar in the corridor. Like the breath from a dragon I feel the iciness of the air as I open the window to let the Siberian air replace the stale smell of cigarette smoke.

The air filled with drumbeats from a shaman’s skin smells like fresh pine needles

I think the connection to the wilderness of nature and spiritual nature of shamanism is clear in all four haiku, that seem to flow so well together in this new theme or genre. I will attempt mine now. I am quite confident I cannot match any of the four of the above.

under an eagle
I dance to the heart beat
of a shaman’s drum

The haiku is fine, but I am happy it shows, and really highlights, just how wonderful the four above are. http://chevrefeuillescarpediem.blogspot.fi/

image

Shaman Woman by Ksenia Spanielf Savchenko